Monday, November 23, 2015

Highlands Student Earns Perfect Score on ACT

Mark Baron and his mother, Elizabeth at the Highlands Soccer Senior Night. DWCPhoto.com
Highlands High School senior Mark Baron earned a perfect score of 36 on the October ACT test. Nationally, less than one-tenth of 1% of all students who take the ACT earn a score of 36.

All high school juniors are required to take the ACT as part of the annual state assessment. However, during his junior year, Baron took the ACT three times. After scoring a 33 on both his first and second attempts, Baron purchased and completed the online ACT Prep course offered through ACT, improving his score to a very impressive 35 on his third test.

Even though Baron states he “was satisfied with a 35” and doesn’t believe “there's much difference between a 35 and a 36 besides being on your game and it being your day,” he decided to take the test again last month to improve his writing score.


“We are so very proud of Mark’s performance,” stated Brian Robinson, Highlands High School principal. “A perfect score of 36 is a feat that very few students in the nation are able to accomplish. This is not only a tribute to his obvious intellectual talents but also illustrates to the entire school community the importance of being goal-centered and dedicated.”

“Mark was in my Pre-AP English I class as a freshman,” said Laura Schnitzler, HHS guidance counselor. “Now that I am working with him as his school counselor, I am proud to see him achieve this tremendous accomplishment.”

As for his long-term plans, Baron stated that he is looking into the sciences for a major, most likely physics. Although he has not made a final college selection as yet, his current number one choice is Vanderbilt University.

The ACT contains five curriculum- and standards-based assessments: English, Mathematics, Reading, Science and an optional Writing Test. Accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States, the assessment is used as a college admissions and placement test and measures the skills and knowledge needed for first-year college success.

1 comment:

  1. Mark, try Cal Tech and/or MIT

    ReplyDelete